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Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Healthy Ways to Have Fun in Recovery

Now that you’re sober, you have a lot of sober fun in your future. In fact, finding healthy ways to enjoy life is key to lasting sobriety. 

Life in recovery is more than just meeting goals, learning and practicing coping skills and restructuring your life. It’s about finding joy, hope and love in life. What are you waiting for? Write down a few sober activities that you might enjoy and prioritize your list. 

Here are a few ways to ensure fun in recovery. 
  • Meet other people. While getting out and meeting new people can seem intimidating, it’s an important part of branching out and having fun during recovery. Sign up for a reading or running group, talk to someone new at your next support group or make a point to introduce yourself to the neighbor you always see at the park. Socializing with others will help you continue to get to know the new sober you and meet like-minded people. 
  • Try a hobby. Hobbies can help you meet new friends with shared interests and fill your newfound time with something you’re passionate about. But what kind of hobby is right for you? Try a few until you find one that fits. There are so many potential choices - from stamp collecting to cabinetry to cooking to joining a running club. Just keep in mind that with most hobbies comes a learning curve, so don’t get discouraged if it takes some time to get the hang of it. 
  • Consider travel. Getting away and discovering new places is a great stress reliever and it’s also a great way to meet new people and experience something different from everyday life. If you can’t afford a big trip, try taking a tour of a nearby city. You’ll be amazed at how much there is to learn right in your own backyard.
  • Laugh always and often. Learning how to laugh at life and yourself is perhaps the best way to enjoy your life in recovery – and it’s free. The road to sobriety is tough and some days will feel never-ending. Take an opportunity to find the funny in even the most mundane recovery tasks. 

Finding Fun at Haus Recovery
We believe sobriety is the beginning of a fun, fulfilling and lifelong adventure. To learn about our program and how we can help you feel good about life and sobriety, call today: 888-551-4715.

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Summertime SAD: What You Need to Know

summertime SADWhen most of us think of seasonal depression, we think of the winter blues or feelings of depression brought on by the darker, colder winter months. More and more experts, however, are noticing seasonal depression in the summer months. There’s even a clinical name for it – Summer-Onset Seasonal Affective Disorder or SO SAD. 

“It is a thing. It is not as common as winter SAD,” Kathryn Roecklein, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh, told TODAY. "We don’t have a lot of research on summer SAD."

So what causes SO SAD? Roecklein said that it’s likely related to how sun and UV light influence mood. “Heat, sun and UV exposure limit people’s ability to engage in pleasant activities,” she said. “It reduces your positive mood and increases depression.” 

The heat can also worsen symptoms of clinical depression, bipolar disorder or other mental illnesses. What's more, interrupted routines, less available support systems, financial stress and body image issues can also contribute to summertime SAD, say experts. 

Luckily, some of the same healthy habits that will help your recovery can help improve symptoms of SO SAD, including regular exercise, proper nutrition, stress management and surrounding yourself with positive people who will have a positive impact on your mood. 

Recognizing SO SAD
The symptoms of summertime SAD are similar to winter SAD and include feeling depressed, hopeless, losing interest in fun activities and struggling to concentrate. Other symptoms include: 
  • Feelings of anxiety, agitation or hopelessness
  • Loss of energy
  • Insomnia
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Difficulty making decisions
  • Lack of interest or participation in things you usually enjoy
  • Withdrawal or isolation 
  • Consistent feelings of sadness
Relapse Prevention at Haus Recovery
If you’re feeling depressed this summer, it’s smart to seek help and regularly attend 12-step meetings. At Haus, we’ll ensure you stay part of a strong recovery community and learn habits to help safeguard your mental health and sobriety. To learn more about our relapse prevention program, call today: 888-551-4725.




Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Healthy Versus Unhealthy Boundaries

Setting healthy boundaries is an important part of lasting sobriety. Boundaries allow you to nurture your wellbeing, establish your identity and protect your mental and physical health. There are different levels and types of boundaries, including physical, emotional and mental boundaries. In general, healthy boundaries determine what we will, and will not, accept in order to stay strong, safe and happy. They are a way to preserve your self-care and self-respect. 

A big part of building healthy boundaries is finding a healthy balance. Here are some examples:

Unhealthy: Giving a lot and receiving nothing back.
Healthy: Being in a relationship where the other person reciprocates.

Unhealthy: Trusting no one or trusting anyone.
Healthy: Striking a balance of trust and skepticism.

Unhealthy: Telling everything to everybody or anybody.
Healthy: Sharing a little at a time while checking to see how the other person responds.

Unhealthy: Falling in love with anyone and without much thought.
Healthy: Taking time to decide whether a potential relationship is right for you and your recovery.

Unhealthy: Going against your personal values or morals to please others.
Healthy: Maintaining self-respect and personal values despite what others want.

Unhealthy: Allowing others to direct your life – without questioning.
Healthy: Trusting your decisions and communicating your needs.

Unhealthy: Self-abuse – sexual, food, physical or substance abuse.
Healthy: Treating yourself with kindness, humor and love and respecting your body and its needs. 

Let Our Mentors Guide You
Even with the recovery skills you’ve gained, you may need help when it comes to setting healthy boundaries for your new sober life. One of the advantages of sober living at HAUS is having fellow residents and a wonderful support team to help you stay clean and respect yourself while you transition from treatment to “normal life.” To learn more about our mentoring services, call today: 888-551-4715.


Monday, July 16, 2018

Mental Health Advice for Dealing With the News

tragic newsWhether you turn on the news or scroll through social media, it often seems like you can’t escape the many horrible things going on in the world. Violence and trauma in the news is tough on everyone – and it’s often more difficult to handle if you’re also struggling with a mental illness like PTSD, anxiety or depression. There’s a higher risk factor for anxiety [and related issues] for someone with a traumatic experience in their background,” Stephanie Dowd, PsyD, a clinical psychologist in the Anxiety and Mood Disorders Center of the Child Mind Institute, told Teen Vogue

Unfortunately, you can’t just shut it all out – nor should you because it’s important to stay current. So how can you deal with the extra stress and anxiety that the news can bring? Here are a few tips to safeguard your mental health if you find yourself particularly sensitive to the news.
  • Expect and accept your reactions. If you react strongly to the news,
    don’t beat yourself up. Practice some self-compassion by taking a deep breath and reminding yourself that it’s okay to experience these emotions. 
  • Limit visual news sources. It’s one thing reading about a tragedy and another looking at visual images of a tragedy. If you’re sensitive to the news, then it’s best to keep up on current events via written form.  
  • Relax your senses. Listen to relaxing music, meditate or soak in a bubble bath – do your best to engage your senses in a soothing way. 
  • Seek support. When your emotions are fragile, it’s always best to reach out to your supports. Call a family member or friend or anyone with whom you feel close and comfortable. 
  • Focus on the helpers. This Mr. Roger’s quote went viral after the Newtown tragedy in 2012: “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me ‘Look for the helpers; you will always find people who are helping.” Focusing on the helpers can help restore your faith in humanity and provide some hope amid the disturbing headlines. And it may even inspire you to give back in some way. 
Rewards of Volunteering
At HAUS Recovery, we believe your recovery is strengthened when you serve others. Studies show that volunteers are less likely to feel isolated or depressed. Volunteering also helps you develop a more accurate view of your life and reminds you of the importance of the shared human experience. To learn more about our volunteer placement service, call today: 888-551-4715.








Monday, July 2, 2018

Surviving July 4th Sober

sober july 4th
Dreading the upcoming holiday? No matter where you are in your sobriety, the Fourth of July can be tough and reminiscent of partying and drinking. To help you have a fun, safe and sober holiday, we’ve put together some tips to help you enjoy your Independence Day and your freedom from addiction. 

Stick with your sober friends. Whether you choose to hang out with one close sober friend or a larger group from your recovery community, make this holiday about being social and sober. Start the day with a group hike or arrange a movie or bowling outing or head to your local parade. If you get stuck on ideas, just pretend that you're kid again. Run around in the heat, have a water balloon toss or roast some marshmallows before heading to the fireworks.

Get active. Physical activity is a surefire way to boost your mood and it will also help balance out all of those extra calories from hot dogs and burgers. Gather up some sober friends and family and test out these fun ways to stay fit this July 4th
  • Three-legged race
  • Sack race
  • Freeze tag
  • Scavenger hunt
  • Tug of war
  • Frisbee
  • Soccer
Host a BYONB party. BYONB stands for “bring your own non-alcoholic beverages” and it’s an easy way to stay social and enjoy your holiday without any temptations.

Do something for someone else. Especially if you’re not in the mood to celebrate, the 4th of July can be the perfect time to give back to others. Volunteer at a soup kitchen or simply help another friend in recovery.

Don’t suffer in silence. You deserve to have a fun 4th of July and sober celebration with family and friends, so reach out if you’re having a bad day, feeling insecure or are tempted to drink or do drugs.

A Fun Sober Life at HAUS Recovery
Sobriety is the beginning of a fun, fulfilling and lifelong adventure. Our schedule of activities is designed to strategically fill your time, nourish your body and enrich your spirit. To learn more how we can help you transition from rehab to everyday life without losing your way, call us today: 888-551-4715.  


Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Navigating Job Interviews After Recovery

job interviewBeing employed is a crucial part of long-term recovery. Showing up for work each day will help you to learn new skills, gain self-confidence and self-sufficiency, have steady income and stability – all critical components for lasting sobriety. That said, job interviews are often stressful! Luckily, a little preparation can help. Start with these tips.
  • Set your intentions ahead of time. Are you or are you not comfortable about talking about your past addiction and recovery? How and when would you share the information? What exactly would you say about your recovery? Are you able to emotionally handle any prejudice? Could your hard-won sobriety serve to demonstrate your ability to work hard and overcome adversity? Answering these questions ahead of time will put you in the driver’s seat so you’re better prepared on the day of the interview.
  • Be consistent. If you decide to keep your recovery to yourself, make sure that your social media presence aligns with your decision for privacy. In other words, you might want to take a look at your privacy settings and/or edit any existing content. Also, you likely have gaps on your resume from when you were in active addiction or treatment and you may need to explain these to a potential employer. 
  • Write down your strengths – and how they’ll help you do the prospective job. This is another pre-interview activity that can help ease nerves on the day of your interview. Especially if you tend to struggle with self-confidence, this exercise can help boost your feelings of self-worth so you go into your interview with your head held high. 
  • Know your rights. The federal Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits employers from discriminating against people with substance use disorders who aren’t currently using drugs. 
  • Remind yourself that perseverance pays. Look how far you’ve already come in your recovery, thanks to your commitment to rehab. Now it’s time to use that same grit to go out and get that job that will give you independence, accountability and purpose in your new sober life.
Employment Help at HAUS
Accountability and being self-supporting are vital steps to the reintegration process, so we encourage our clients to work. Our staff will assist with resume building and more. To learn more about our services, contact us today: 888-551-4715.


Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Nostalgia During Recovery: What You Need to Know

nostalgiaAs summer rolls around, it’s easy to get nostalgic for your former days of hanging out on sunny days or warm nights drinking or doing drugs with your old group of friends. After all, addiction was likely a substantial part of your life and it’s pretty normal for these memories to pop into your mind now and again. 

But if you find yourself romanticizing and daydreaming about these times you need to take notice. This is because nostalgia can be a slippery slope into relapse. 

Let’s first talk about nostalgia – what is it and how can it hurt or help your recovery? 

Nostalgia is often defined as “a sentimental longing or wistful affection for the past, and often for a period or place with happy associations.” Feeling nostalgic isn’t always negative, especially if you’re summoning past memories that help motivate you to stay on the sober path. In this way, a bit of nostalgia can serve as a great reminder of why you’re working so hard in your recovery. 

However, if you begin longing for a past way of life that included abusing alcohol and/or drugs, it can be dangerous. For one, when you’re nostalgic, you tend to focus on only the good and not the bad. In other words, you’re not daydreaming about being hung over or embarrassing yourself or all the hurt you may have caused friends and family members. And this type of nostalgia can easily make you lose your way and forget why you’re sober and even help you rationalize an unhealthy decision. 

Certainly you can’t stop nostalgia, but you can redirect your thoughts so they better serve your recovery. And you can also make sure that part of your recovery includes meeting new friends, experiencing new things and making new memories that keep your mind busy. And, hopefully, one day you'll look back fondly on all you've learned on your journey toward lasting sobriety.  

Making New Memories at HAUS Recovery
We believe that sobriety is the beginning of a fun, fulfilling, and lifelong adventure. Our schedule of activities is designed to strategically fill your time, nourish your body and enrich your spirit. To learn more how we can help you transition from rehab to everyday life without losing your way, call us today: 888-551-4715.  



Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Creative Ways to Give Back to Your Community

volunteering
According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, there are four essential components of a life in addiction recovery: health, home, purpose and last but not least community. 

Perhaps the best way to develop a sense of community is by volunteering. By giving back to your community, you’ll enhance your self-worth, find meaning in your new sober life, build a network of healthy relationships, boost your job skills, reduce stress and reduce your risk of relapse. In other words, volunteering in the community is a perfect way to do something positive for yourself and your recovery while helping others at the same time.

Fortunately it’s pretty easy to find an opportunity to give back. There are plenty of local organizations that welcome volunteers – the key is just finding a cause that aligns with your own interests and passions. Here are a few ideas to get you started:
  • Pal around with some pets. Animal shelters are a great place to lend a hand and spending time with animals will have plenty of mental health perks for you, too. Many shelters now have reading programs to help ease animals’ anxieties. Call your local rescue group to see how you can help.
  • Send a note. Handwritten “Get well soon” or “inspirational” cards can help cheer up members in your recovery community as well as others in the community at large, including children’s hospital patients, cancer survivors or even seniors. Put on your creativity cap and start sending colorful and uplifting wishes to those who need them the most.
  • Double up your recipes. The next time you plan on whipping up a batch of homemade cookies or comforting lasagna, consider making an extra batch to you local fire or police station or veteran’s group. It’s an easy way to thank them for their dedication and selfless services.
Help Yourself and Others at Haus Recovery
During your stay at the HAUS, we hope you take advantage of the mentorship offered, and in turn, benefit fellow residents with your personal recovery insights. In time, everyone grows in strength and empowerment as they share both doubts and successes. To learn more about our mentoring services, call today: 888-551-4715.



Tuesday, May 8, 2018

30 Days of Better Mental Health

It’s Mental Health Month, created by Mental Health America, and one of the many important messages this year is that small steps can have a big impact on your mental health. In fact, MHA created a list of things you can do this month to boost your emotional wellbeing and overall healthy self. 

Bonus: They’ll help give you greater strength to endure the ups and downs of recovery, too.
  1. Keep a journal. Write down 3 things you’re grateful for and 3 things you’ve accomplished
  2. Plan a sober holiday. Having something to look forward to has been study proven to boost happiness for up to 8 weeks, notes MHA. 
  3. Build on your strengths. Do something your good at and then use that self-confidence to tackle a tougher task. 
  4. Turn down the temp before your turn it. Keep your room cool – between 60˚ and 67˚ Fahrenheit – for optimal sleep.
  5. Make a plan. List one thing you want to improve in your life and one small step you can take to help that happen. 
  6. Get creative. Try a new recipe, write a poem, paint, experiment with a Pinterest project – whatever gets those creative juices flowing. 
  7. Treat yourself to dark chocolate. Go ahead and pop a few pieces a few times per week. According to MHA, chocolate is filled with flavanoids, caffeine and theobromine, which all work together to improve alertness and mental skills. 
  8. Share your story on social media. Talk about your personal experience with mental illness and/or addiction. This will not only empower you but may empower someone else to seek help. And don’t forget to include #mentalillnessfeelslike, notes MHA. 
  9. See the sunny side of things. Put a positive spin on something that wasn’t so great that happened in your day today. 
  10. Break out the crayons. Coloring for about 20 minutes can help you clear your mind. MHA suggests choosing a design that's geometric and a little complicated for the best results.
  11. Laugh it up. A good chuckle does wonders for anxiety. Call a funny friend, check out cute videos online or cue a comedy. 
  12. Go off the grid. Shut off your smartphone and disconnect for the day. This means no Facebook, twitter, text messages, emails, etc. Use the free time for a little face-to-face time with someone you care about. 
  13. Get down while you do housework. You’ll gain a sense of accomplishment by getting your chores done and you’ll boost your mood! Dancing reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol and increases feel-good endorphins in the body, according to MHA. 
  14. Let out a big yawn. This simple act has been shown to improve alertness and mental efficiency.
  15. Soak in a warm bath. Try adding Epsom salts known to boost magnesium levels, which can be depleted by stress.
  16. Write it out. Journaling has been linked to fewer symptoms of depression, especially if you’re writing about an upsetting or stressful experience. 
  17. Hang with a furry friend. Spending time with animals has been found to lower cortisol (stress hormone) and boosts oxytocin, which stimulates feelings of happiness. 
  18. Stay in the now. Try a little mindfulness meditation to help you stay in the present and prevent dwelling on the past or future. 
  19. Put on your tourist hat. Making time for fun is a surefire way to boost your mind. Why not start in your own town or city – you may be surprised by all of the cool things in your backyard. 
  20. Prep your week. Make your lunches and/or pick out your clothes for the week ahead – you’ll save time and sanity in the morning. 
  21. Load up on omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s, found in foods like wild salmon, flaxseeds or walnuts, help build healthy gut bacteria and decrease rates of depression and schizophrenia. 
  22. Forgive someone. People who forgive have better mental health and have been found to be more satisfied with their lives.
  23. Smile. Even if it’s forced, smiling can help lower your heart rate and tame tension.
  24. Send a thank-you note. Written expressions of gratitude are linked to increased happiness.
  25. Make a date with friends and/or family. According to MHA, people are 12 times more likely to feel happy on days that they spend six to seven hours with friends and family.
  26. Spend time in nature. Whether you take a stroll through a park or a hike in the woods, research shows that being in nature can increase energy levels, reduce depression and boost well-being, notes MHA.
  27. Get some mood-boosting vitamin D. The best way is soak up the sunshine for 15 minutes without sunscreen. 
  28. Step out of your comfort zone. Try something new. A big part of lasting sobriety and good mental health is finding sober excitement in your life. 
  29. Reward yourself. Even small milestones deserve a pat on the back. This will help keep you motivated and moving forward.
  30. Put exercise on your calendar. Whether you carve out 10 minutes or 30 minutes, write down a time that you’ll be able to be active and stick with it.  
Relapse Prevention at Haus Recovery
When the stresses of life overwhelm you, it’s easy to turn to your drug of choice in order to escape. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

How to Be More Patient

how to be more patient
Having patience is linked with a host of health and recovery benefits. This includes being more mindful, less lonely and better able to overcome stressful situations and stick with goals. 

Simply put, patience is going to help you better deal with the ups and downs along your journey toward lasting sobriety. As you likely know, recovery requires lots of patience – with the process, with yourself and with loved ones.

So what if you’re just not a patient person? Many people in recovery aren’t. This is because you’ve likely spent a fair amount of time in “instant-fix” mode during active addiction. But here’s the good news: Patience is a skill that can be learned through practice – and these tips can help you get started: 
  • Make yourself wait. Test your willpower with small tasks – whether you make yourself hold off to eat dessert or choose a longer line in the grocery store. 
  • Embrace being uncomfortable. A big part of recovery is being okay with being outside your comfort zone. During these times, try to remind yourself that these feelings are temporary and that being impatient about your circumstances won’t help.
  • Just breathe. Inhale for a count of 7 and exhale for a count of 8 – this simple breathing exercise can help you slow down and tap into your patient side.
  • Find a healthy release for your emotions. Even if you’ve mastered patience, you will get frustrated and lose your patience from time to time. And that’s okay – as long as you release that frustration in a healthy way. Some ideas: Take a walk, meditate, vent to a good friend, or distract yourself with a funny movie or YouTube video. 
Post-Treatment Support for Men & Women
At Haus Recovery, we provide our clients with continued support as they transition from a secure recovery environment to sober life filled with daily stressors and tension. To learn more, call today: 888-551-4715.


Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Spring Clean Your Resume

spring clean your resumeSpring is the perfect time to “clean up” your resume and significantly improve it so you can start seeing better results. After all, just like our closets, resumes need a good yearly cleaning and/or organizing to determine what to keep, what to toss and what to emphasize to put your best foot forward. 

Here are few questions to ask yourself as you freshen-up your resume so it’s current and appealing to prospective employers.  

  • Is your experience still relevant? A good rule of thumb: You should only show the most recent 10 to 15 years of your career history. Take a look at your resume and determine what’s ancient history and what needs to be highlighted to meet the criteria of the positions to which you’re applying. For example, if you’re focused on a career in accounting, you no longer need to include your past job in a pet store.  
  • Are you grabbing the reader’s attention? Take a look at the “career summary” section of your resume and make sure that you’ve highlighted your experiences, skills and contributions in a succinct manner. The goal is to showcase your skill sets with no more than five or six lines of text, say resume experts. 
  • Are you using the right language? The best resumes often use strong action verbs — managed, launched, built, lead — at the beginning of each section. Read over your resume and edit any passive phrases like “responsible for” or “handled.” 
  • Are you being specific? Do your best to quantify your experience — for instance, can you attach a measurement to a past job task or accomplishment like an increase in profit or level of customer satisfaction? 
  • Are you being honest? Lying or “stretching the truth” on a resume is never okay. 
  • Is anything missing? Take a look at the specific requirements of your target job — do you possess these skills and are they coming across clearly on your resume? And if you find that you're missing any of these skill sets, why not use this time to start a plan to learn them. 
Employment Help at HAUS 
Finding and keeping a job, and making a contribution to society, is a pillar of recovery. After all, accountability and being self-supporting are vital steps to the reintegration process. Our staff will assist you with resume building and more. To learn about our sober living services, call today: 888-551-4715.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Spring Fun in Santa Monica

spring fun in santa monicaSpring has sprung and it’s the perfect time to step outside, enjoy the fresh air and take advantage of the abundance of seasonal activities taking place in Santa Monica! 

There’s plenty to do – from farmer’s markets to kite festivals and paddleboarding contests – and here’s the best part: it’s all sober fun!
  • Take part in the Annual Kite Festival on April 14 at Santa Monica Pier. Participants receive a free kite and kite makers from across the U.S. create a “gallery in the sky” as they showcase their unique designs.
  • Celebrate Earth Day with Heal the Bay’s Santa Monica Pier Aquarium on April 21. Participants who help with beach cleanup will receive free admission to the aquarium.
  • Come together with the Santa Monica community for a day of 5Ks, DJ-powered yoga sessions and guided meditation during Wanderlust 108—The World’s Only Mindful Triathlon on April 28. 
  • Watch top athletes compete in stand-up paddleboard, prone paddleboard, dory and swim races in the 8th annual Pier Paddleboard Race & Ocean Festival on June 9. 
And, of course, there’s plenty of ways to enjoy spring on weekends without any scheduled events. Try one of these ideas: 
  • Visit your local farmer’s market and stock up on seasonal produce like artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower and fava beans.
  • Plan an outdoor picnic and invite friends for a game of Frisbee.
  • Take a long hike or stroll on the beach.
  • Plant a garden filled with fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Sit outside and meditate or write in a journal. 
Spring Recovery Fun in Santa Monica
Sustained recovery should incorporate daily fun and our Southern California location is blessed with mild temperatures and abundant sunshine, making it the perfect place to enjoy outdoor recreation as part of your recovery activities. HAUS has bikes, surfboards and paddleboards for residents to use, and we organize group activities and outings every week. To learn more about our sober living services, activities and amenities, call today: 888-551-4715.




Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Is Stress Contagious?

Feeling stressed? It could be contagious, according to research published in Nature Neuroscience. A new study found that you can pass tension to someone else – even a stranger – and without even knowing it.

“Recent studies indicate that stress and emotions can be ‘contagious,’ ” Jaideep Bains, a physiology professor at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, wrote in a press release. “Whether this has lasting consequences for the brain is not known.”

Although this was a mouse study, researchers believe these findings are also relevant in humans. “We readily communicate our stress to others, sometimes without even knowing it,” Bain says. “There is even evidence that some symptoms of stress can persist in family and loved ones of individuals who suffer from PTSD.”

What is stress? The American Institute of Stress defines it as “an emotional and/or physical response your body has to situations or change that make you feel uncomfortable or anxious” – and it’s different for everyone.

Those of us in the recovery world likely know that stress is a pretty well-know relapse trigger. What's more, chronic stress can lead to a host of health conditions, including high blood pressure, sleep disturbances, headaches and mood swings. It can also impact your relationships and productivity in the workplace. 

Being mindful of your own stress and how you feel around others who tend to be “stressed out” a lot is a great first step in taming tensions. The following anxiety-reduction techniques can help, too. Bonus: they'll also strengthen your recovery.
  • Regular exercise 
  • Stretching and breathing exercises
  • Meditation
  • Yoga
  • Spending time in nature
  • Journaling
Get Nurtured in Nature
Our Southern California location is blessed with mild temperatures and abundant sunshine, making it the perfect place for outdoor recreation as part of your stress management and recovery activities. To learn more about our sober living services, activities and amenities, call today: 888-551-4715.



Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Signs of an Emotionally Abusive Relationship

A big part of staying mentally healthy and preventing relapse is being able to take a good honest look at your relationships. After all, surrounding yourself with people who support you and make you a better you will only serve to help your lasting sobriety. 

Abuse can take many different forms, including emotional abuse, and the signs aren't always easy to spot. This is why it’s important to take a step back and consider any red flags that may mean it’s time to walk away. 

According to the National Domestic Violence hotline, you may be in an emotionally/verbally abusive relationship if you partner exerts control through:
  • Calling you names, insulting you or continually criticizing you
  • Refusing to trust you and acting jealous or possessive
  • Trying to isolate you from family or friends
  • Monitoring where you go, who you call and who you spend time with
  • Demanding to know where you are every minute
  • Trapping you in your home or preventing you from leaving
  • Punishing you by withholding affection
  • Threatening to hurt you, the children, your family or your pets
  • Humiliating you in any way
  • Blaming you for the abuse
  • Gaslighting
  • Accusing you of cheating and being often jealous of your outside relationships
  • Serially cheating on you and then blaming you for his or her behavior
  • Cheating on you intentionally to hurt you and then threatening to cheat again
  • Cheating to prove that they are more desired, worthy, etc. than you are
  • Attempting to control your appearance: what you wear, how much/little makeup you wear, etc.
  • Telling you that you will never find anyone better, or that you are lucky to be with a person like them
Let Our Mentors Guide You
Even with the recovery skills you’ve gained, you may feel uneasy when it comes to relationships. One of the advantages of sober living at HAUS is having fellow residents and a wonderful support team to help you stay clean and respect yourself while you transition from treatment to “normal life.” To learn more about our mentoring services, call today: 888-551-4715.



Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Self-Care Tips to Try This Valentine's Day

We’ve talked about how self-care is key to lasting sobriety and Valentine’s Day is the perfect day to put it to the test. 

Let’s start by defining self-care. Here’s a good definition from Goodtherapy.org: “At its most basic definition, self-care is any intentional action taken to meet an individual’s physical, mental, spiritual or emotional needs. In short, it’s the little ways we take care of ourselves to avoid a breakdown in those respective areas of health.”

So with this in mind, what are some simple steps you can take to nurture yourself on Valentine’s Day and everyday? Here are a few ideas to get you started: 
  • Go for a long walk or hike and pop in some headphones and listen to your favorite tunes.
  • Create a piece of artwork — color, draw, paint, cut and paste, whatever helps spark your creativity.
  • Make yourself a proper meal – whether a hearty breakfast, warm lunch or well-rounded dinner with fresh ingredients. 
  • Tame negative self-talk by telling yourself something encouraging like “I’m doing my best today.” Or, take it a step further and post the affirmation where you’ll see it every day. 
  • Listen to a podcast about something that interests you or that you want to learn more about.
  • Attend a support group meeting and share – or just listen. 
  • Give yourself a giggle by watching your favorite movie or meeting up with a friend who always tickles your funny bone.
  • Carve out some quiet time – to just relax and reflect, mediate or get lost in a good book. Or dim the lights, lie on the floor and just breathe.
  • Check in with yourself emotionally – how do you feel? Are any negative thoughts interfering with your growth and recovery?
  • Do something nice for someone else – with no strings attached. 
A Healthier Lifestyle With Deeper Purpose
At Haus Recovery, we help our clients stay focused, maintain a positive attitude and care for themselves in order to attain their full recovery potential. To learn more about our services and activities, call us today: 888-551-4715.


Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Do You Need a Mental Health Day?

A big part of staying on the sober path is paying attention to your emotional well-being and realizing when it needs a little extra TLC. Taking a day to unwind, de-stress and refocus will help you stay mentally strong and prevent relapse.

But how do you know when it’s time to slow down and mentally recharge? Here’s help: These warning signs should prompt you to slow down and take a day to mentally recharge. Spend some time with loved ones, engage in relaxing activities like yoga or meditation, explore nature or just sleep in and enjoy a leisurely breakfast – whatever helps reduce anxiety and recharge your mental reserves. 
  • You’re tossing and turning. A change in sleep is a surefire sign that your mind and body is in overdrive and needs a little extra attention. What’s worse, if you ignore sleep troubles you can get stuck in a vicious cycle in which lack of sleep increases your stress and your stress makes it harder to sleep. 
  • You’re irritable and cranky. Do you feel irritable all day but there’ s really nothing in particular you’re angry about? Are you “snippy” with loved ones, friends and coworkers? This could be due to the fact that your nerves are fired and up and you’re mentally shorting out. And it’s likely worse if you’re not sleeping well. Taking a day away from it all (curl up with a good book or catch up on your favorite Netlfix series) could be just the anecdote to ease your mood. 
  • You’re achy and feel muscle tension. These are signs that your body is carrying stress and needs a break. But this doesn’t mean you need to take a day off to lie on the couch. In fact, you’ll feel better if you spend the day moving your body in a gentle but exhilarating way. Try a brisk walk or yoga class. 
  • You’re always getting sick. Reoccurring colds or digestive ailments may be your body telling you to slow down. Chronic stress, after all, can make you sick. Some experts claim that stress is responsible for as much as 90% of all illnesses and diseases. Stay home for a day and focus on a few relaxation strategies (meditation or guided imagery, for instance) to boost your mental health and your immune system.
Relapse Prevention at Haus Recovery
When the stresses of life overwhelm you, it’s easy to turn to your drug of choice in order to escape. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.


Monday, January 8, 2018

Tips to Develop a More Positive Mindset


Optimism is a pretty powerful tool for lasting sobriety. Having a positive mindset has been found to benefit your physical health – lower blood pressure, reduced risk for heart disease, healthier weight, better blood sugar levels and longer life.

And it plays a big role in your mental health as well. In fact, being able to hold onto positive emotions and appreciate the good times is one sign of emotional health. In general, people who are emotionally well have fewer negative emotions and are able to bounce back from difficulties faster. They’re also more open to new ideas and personal growth. 

Certainly, we can all use a bit more resilience and open-mindedness when it comes to navigating the natural ups and downs of addiction recovery. 

That said, having a positive outlook doesn’t mean that you’ll never feel negative emotions, such as sadness or anger, Dr. Barbara L. Fredrickson, a psychologist and expert on emotional wellness at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, told the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “The key seems to be finding a balance between the two.” 

5 Ways to Enhance Emotional Wellness

Being positive may take a bit of practice. These tips from NIH can help: 
  1. Forgive yourself. Everyone makes mistakes, so learn from what went wrong and try not to dwell on it.
  2. Explore the meaning and purpose of life. Take time to think about how what's important to you and try to guide your life by those principles.
  3. Practice healthy habits. Make good nutrition, physical activity, and regular sleep a priority for your physical and mental health.
  4. Spend time with friends. Be choosy about your supports and go out of your way to surround yourself with positive, healthy people.
  5. Remember good deeds. Allow yourself to take credit for the good things you do for others each day.
Help Yourself and Others at Haus Recovery
During your stay at the HAUS, we hope you take advantage of the mentorship offered, and in turn, benefit fellow residents with your personal recovery insights. In time, everyone grows in strength and empowerment as they share both doubts and successes. To learn more about our mentoring services, call today: 888-551-4715.