Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Do You Need a Mental Health Day?

A big part of staying on the sober path is paying attention to your emotional well-being and realizing when it needs a little extra TLC. Taking a day to unwind, de-stress and refocus will help you stay mentally strong and prevent relapse.

But how do you know when it’s time to slow down and mentally recharge? Here’s help: These warning signs should prompt you to slow down and take a day to mentally recharge. Spend some time with loved ones, engage in relaxing activities like yoga or meditation, explore nature or just sleep in and enjoy a leisurely breakfast – whatever helps reduce anxiety and recharge your mental reserves. 
  • You’re tossing and turning. A change in sleep is a surefire sign that your mind and body is in overdrive and needs a little extra attention. What’s worse, if you ignore sleep troubles you can get stuck in a vicious cycle in which lack of sleep increases your stress and your stress makes it harder to sleep. 
  • You’re irritable and cranky. Do you feel irritable all day but there’ s really nothing in particular you’re angry about? Are you “snippy” with loved ones, friends and coworkers? This could be due to the fact that your nerves are fired and up and you’re mentally shorting out. And it’s likely worse if you’re not sleeping well. Taking a day away from it all (curl up with a good book or catch up on your favorite Netlfix series) could be just the anecdote to ease your mood. 
  • You’re achy and feel muscle tension. These are signs that your body is carrying stress and needs a break. But this doesn’t mean you need to take a day off to lie on the couch. In fact, you’ll feel better if you spend the day moving your body in a gentle but exhilarating way. Try a brisk walk or yoga class. 
  • You’re always getting sick. Reoccurring colds or digestive ailments may be your body telling you to slow down. Chronic stress, after all, can make you sick. Some experts claim that stress is responsible for as much as 90% of all illnesses and diseases. Stay home for a day and focus on a few relaxation strategies (meditation or guided imagery, for instance) to boost your mental health and your immune system.
Relapse Prevention at Haus Recovery
When the stresses of life overwhelm you, it’s easy to turn to your drug of choice in order to escape. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.

Monday, January 8, 2018

Tips to Develop a More Positive Mindset

Optimism is a pretty powerful tool for lasting sobriety. Having a positive mindset has been found to benefit your physical health – lower blood pressure, reduced risk for heart disease, healthier weight, better blood sugar levels and longer life.

And it plays a big role in your mental health as well. In fact, being able to hold onto positive emotions and appreciate the good times is one sign of emotional health. In general, people who are emotionally well have fewer negative emotions and are able to bounce back from difficulties faster. They’re also more open to new ideas and personal growth. 

Certainly, we can all use a bit more resilience and open-mindedness when it comes to navigating the natural ups and downs of addiction recovery. 

That said, having a positive outlook doesn’t mean that you’ll never feel negative emotions, such as sadness or anger, Dr. Barbara L. Fredrickson, a psychologist and expert on emotional wellness at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, told the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “The key seems to be finding a balance between the two.” 

5 Ways to Enhance Emotional Wellness

Being positive may take a bit of practice. These tips from NIH can help: 
  1. Forgive yourself. Everyone makes mistakes, so learn from what went wrong and try not to dwell on it.
  2. Explore the meaning and purpose of life. Take time to think about how what's important to you and try to guide your life by those principles.
  3. Practice healthy habits. Make good nutrition, physical activity, and regular sleep a priority for your physical and mental health.
  4. Spend time with friends. Be choosy about your supports and go out of your way to surround yourself with positive, healthy people.
  5. Remember good deeds. Allow yourself to take credit for the good things you do for others each day.
Help Yourself and Others at Haus Recovery
During your stay at the HAUS, we hope you take advantage of the mentorship offered, and in turn, benefit fellow residents with your personal recovery insights. In time, everyone grows in strength and empowerment as they share both doubts and successes. To learn more about our mentoring services, call today: 888-551-4715.