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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Self-Care Tips to Try This Valentine's Day

We’ve talked about how self-care is key to lasting sobriety and Valentine’s Day is the perfect day to put it to the test. 

Let’s start by defining self-care. Here’s a good definition from Goodtherapy.org: “At its most basic definition, self-care is any intentional action taken to meet an individual’s physical, mental, spiritual or emotional needs. In short, it’s the little ways we take care of ourselves to avoid a breakdown in those respective areas of health.”

So with this in mind, what are some simple steps you can take to nurture yourself on Valentine’s Day and everyday? Here are a few ideas to get you started: 
  • Go for a long walk or hike and pop in some headphones and listen to your favorite tunes.
  • Create a piece of artwork — color, draw, paint, cut and paste, whatever helps spark your creativity.
  • Make yourself a proper meal – whether a hearty breakfast, warm lunch or well-rounded dinner with fresh ingredients. 
  • Tame negative self-talk by telling yourself something encouraging like “I’m doing my best today.” Or, take it a step further and post the affirmation where you’ll see it every day. 
  • Listen to a podcast about something that interests you or that you want to learn more about.
  • Attend a support group meeting and share – or just listen. 
  • Give yourself a giggle by watching your favorite movie or meeting up with a friend who always tickles your funny bone.
  • Carve out some quiet time – to just relax and reflect, mediate or get lost in a good book. Or dim the lights, lie on the floor and just breathe.
  • Check in with yourself emotionally – how do you feel? Are any negative thoughts interfering with your growth and recovery?
  • Do something nice for someone else – with no strings attached. 
A Healthier Lifestyle With Deeper Purpose
At Haus Recovery, we help our clients stay focused, maintain a positive attitude and care for themselves in order to attain their full recovery potential. To learn more about our services and activities, call us today: 888-551-4715.


Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Do You Need a Mental Health Day?

A big part of staying on the sober path is paying attention to your emotional well-being and realizing when it needs a little extra TLC. Taking a day to unwind, de-stress and refocus will help you stay mentally strong and prevent relapse.

But how do you know when it’s time to slow down and mentally recharge? Here’s help: These warning signs should prompt you to slow down and take a day to mentally recharge. Spend some time with loved ones, engage in relaxing activities like yoga or meditation, explore nature or just sleep in and enjoy a leisurely breakfast – whatever helps reduce anxiety and recharge your mental reserves. 
  • You’re tossing and turning. A change in sleep is a surefire sign that your mind and body is in overdrive and needs a little extra attention. What’s worse, if you ignore sleep troubles you can get stuck in a vicious cycle in which lack of sleep increases your stress and your stress makes it harder to sleep. 
  • You’re irritable and cranky. Do you feel irritable all day but there’ s really nothing in particular you’re angry about? Are you “snippy” with loved ones, friends and coworkers? This could be due to the fact that your nerves are fired and up and you’re mentally shorting out. And it’s likely worse if you’re not sleeping well. Taking a day away from it all (curl up with a good book or catch up on your favorite Netlfix series) could be just the anecdote to ease your mood. 
  • You’re achy and feel muscle tension. These are signs that your body is carrying stress and needs a break. But this doesn’t mean you need to take a day off to lie on the couch. In fact, you’ll feel better if you spend the day moving your body in a gentle but exhilarating way. Try a brisk walk or yoga class. 
  • You’re always getting sick. Reoccurring colds or digestive ailments may be your body telling you to slow down. Chronic stress, after all, can make you sick. Some experts claim that stress is responsible for as much as 90% of all illnesses and diseases. Stay home for a day and focus on a few relaxation strategies (meditation or guided imagery, for instance) to boost your mental health and your immune system.
Relapse Prevention at Haus Recovery
When the stresses of life overwhelm you, it’s easy to turn to your drug of choice in order to escape. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.


Monday, January 8, 2018

Tips to Develop a More Positive Mindset


Optimism is a pretty powerful tool for lasting sobriety. Having a positive mindset has been found to benefit your physical health – lower blood pressure, reduced risk for heart disease, healthier weight, better blood sugar levels and longer life.

And it plays a big role in your mental health as well. In fact, being able to hold onto positive emotions and appreciate the good times is one sign of emotional health. In general, people who are emotionally well have fewer negative emotions and are able to bounce back from difficulties faster. They’re also more open to new ideas and personal growth. 

Certainly, we can all use a bit more resilience and open-mindedness when it comes to navigating the natural ups and downs of addiction recovery. 

That said, having a positive outlook doesn’t mean that you’ll never feel negative emotions, such as sadness or anger, Dr. Barbara L. Fredrickson, a psychologist and expert on emotional wellness at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, told the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “The key seems to be finding a balance between the two.” 

5 Ways to Enhance Emotional Wellness

Being positive may take a bit of practice. These tips from NIH can help: 
  1. Forgive yourself. Everyone makes mistakes, so learn from what went wrong and try not to dwell on it.
  2. Explore the meaning and purpose of life. Take time to think about how what's important to you and try to guide your life by those principles.
  3. Practice healthy habits. Make good nutrition, physical activity, and regular sleep a priority for your physical and mental health.
  4. Spend time with friends. Be choosy about your supports and go out of your way to surround yourself with positive, healthy people.
  5. Remember good deeds. Allow yourself to take credit for the good things you do for others each day.
Help Yourself and Others at Haus Recovery
During your stay at the HAUS, we hope you take advantage of the mentorship offered, and in turn, benefit fellow residents with your personal recovery insights. In time, everyone grows in strength and empowerment as they share both doubts and successes. To learn more about our mentoring services, call today: 888-551-4715.

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Tips for a Fun and Sober New Year's Eve

For those of us who are sober, New Year’s Eve can be a slippery slope into relapse. The best solution, even if you have some recovery time under your belt, is to celebrate away from toxic environments filled with alcohol or drugs. 

Making plans now for a sober New Year’s Eve will help you avoid temptation and/or triggers, so you're sure to ring in the New Year the right way. 

Here are some fun, sober ideas to consider:
  • Go to a meeting marathon. Many local chapters of AA and NA hold meeting marathons on New Year’s Eve to help you strengthen your recovery during this tough time of year.
  • Sign up for a midnight race. You can even organize one of your own; an invigorating run around town is the perfect way to ring in the New Year. 
  • Gather some sober friends for a nice dinner out on the town. Call ahead to make sure that you’re not served a “complementary” champagne or brought out a wine list. 
  • Laugh in the New Year by going to a local comedy club. Again, you may need to call ahead so you’re not tempted with alcohol. 
  • Arrange an ice skating party with a few recovery peers.
  • Host a fun game night with some festive appetizers and non-alcoholic beverages.
  • Take a weekend get-away with a sober loved one. Use this time to relax and reflect upon your recovery.
  • Give yourself a spa night and go to sleep early – even before the ball drops if that’s what your body craves.
  • Have a movie marathon accompanied with some popcorn and hot chocolate.
No matter what you choose to do, be prepared. If you plan to spend New Year’s in a place where alcohol is being served, for example, make sure to have a support system in place and to devise an exit strategy if you become uncomfortable.

Wishing you a happy, healthy and sober 2018! 

Preventing Relapse All Season 
A relapse only requires a moment of weakness; when the stresses of life overwhelm you, it’s easy to turn to your drug of choice in order to escape. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.



Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Winter Sober Fun in Santa Monica

There’s so much to experience in Santa Monica during the holiday season – and being sober is just part of the fun. Here are just a few fun activities to add to your winter to-do list. 
  • Go to the beach. While you won’t want to venture into the freezing water, you certainly can dive into a good book. Throw on a sweatshirt, pack a blanket and pick a spot to relax on the beach with an inspirational read.  
  • Lace up your ice skates. Every holiday season, Santa Monica transforms the corner of 5th Street and Arizona Avenue into a 8,000 square foot ice rink – perfect for getting a taste of winter without the frostbite. In fact, there are a handful of outdoor rinks in the LA-area that stay frozen through January and February. 
  • Take a hike. It’s the perfect season to climb into the hills – with no crowds and clear crystal skies. Just remember to dress in layers and be sure to take into account the fleeting daylight before setting out on your hike. 
  • Get your soup on. There’s nothing better than a bowl of ramen – or udon or miso or pho – to warm your bones on those 50 degree days. Call up a friend and head to Little Tokyo or Sawtelle. 
  • Visit Santa. You’re never too old for a photo with Saint Nick. Head to Center Plaza at Santa Monica Place and feel like a kid again as you visit his winter home. 
  • Schedule a spa day. The holidays are filled with stress and a little relaxation and rejuvenation is likely in order. Check your local area for any holiday spa specials and give yourself the gift of self-care this season.
More Sober Living Activities
At Haus Recovery, we whole-heartedly believe that sustained recovery should incorporate daily fun. To this end, we organize group activities and outings every week. To learn more, call today: 888-551-4715.


Tuesday, November 21, 2017

6 Tips for a Healthy, Sober Thanksgiving

Whether this is your first Thanksgiving post-rehab or you have several years under your belt, sticking to a few healthy habits will ensure that you have a fun and sober holiday. 

Start with these helpful tips: 
  1. Count your blessings. Thanksgiving is the perfect time of year to reflect on your recovery and new sober life. Take time this holiday to express gratitude to the friends and family who have helped with your journey. 
  2. Think out-of-the box. If you’re not ready to spend time with family or attend a celebration that may include alcohol, then it's okay to create a new sober tradition with a few supportive friends or family members. Some ideas: Have a baking party, go on a nature hike, see a movie, or volunteer at a local soup kitchen.
  3. Keep stress at bay. Make an effort on Thanksgiving to make time for self-care, whether you go for a jog, write in your journal or meditate in the morning before the festivities. And don’t forget to focus on sleep. Sticking to a regular bedtime routine is more important than ever during the busy holiday season ahead. 
  4. Indulge wisely. Try not to completely undue the healthy eating habits you’ve learned to support your recovery. Load up on the veggies and enjoy moderate portions of your favorite sides, entrees and desserts.  
  5. Bring your own beverage. Why not bring the host a bottle of flavored water or sparkling cider that you and the guests can all enjoy. 
  6. Have an emergency plan. Ask a sponsor or trusted friend to be on-call in case you begin to feel overwhelmed. If you’re traveling, it’s also wise to looking up 12-step meetings in the area. 
Preventing Relapse All Season 
A relapse only requires a moment of weakness; when the stresses of life overwhelm you, it’s easy to turn to your drug of choice in order to escape. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.




Tuesday, November 7, 2017

6 Benefits of Music for Your Recovery

Music therapy is offered at many rehabs – and listening, singing along or playing songs may even have helped you cope with early sobriety. 

Don’t turn off those tunes just yet, however. Even after rehab, the right notes can help you eat and sleep better, stress less, move more and have greater self-awareness – all important habits for overall health and lasting sobriety. 

And these are just a few of the many incredible health benefits of music; here’s a closer look at these and a few others.
  • Less fatigue. Whether rock, hip hop or jazz, upbeat music has been study-proven to boost your energy. On the flip side, calming music has been found to help a person fall asleep. 
  • Better mood. Music has been shown to lower cortisol levels and reduce stress and it can even minimize the effects of depression.
  • Healthier eating habits. Diners ate about 18 percent less and reported enjoying their food more when participants dined with jazz music playing, according to a Cornell study.
  • Anger management. The next time you feel your blood boiling after a driver cuts you off, switch on some mellow music. This will help you stay calmer and make fewer mistakes according to research published in the journal Ergonomics.
  • Increased self-awareness. One study found that listening to music helped study participants to think about themselves, who they wanted to be and give them an escape from the present. 
  • More motivation to move. Music with high-groove qualities induces movement in the listener. In other words, the right playlist can help you move no matter how much you’re dreading that workout. 

More Sober Living Activities
At Haus Recovery, we whole-heartedly believe that sustained recovery should incorporate daily fun. To this end, we offer bikes, surfboards and paddleboards for residents and organize group activities and outings every week. To learn more, call today: 888-551-4715.