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Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Secrets to Enjoying Holiday Parties Sober

If you’re in recovery, holiday parties can bring an extra set of pressures and challenges. But socializing sober can be fun – and a little planning can make it a ton more comfortable. 

Experts say that one of the smartest ways to enjoy holiday parties is to avoid going alone – in other words, bring a date in the form of a trusted family member or friend who supports your sobriety. If it’s not possible to have someone come with you, make sure you arrange for someone to be “on call” – via text or phone should you need to reach out for extra support.

Volunteering to help out also works for some people in sobriety. For example, you can volunteer to set up the decorations, take pictures or be a designated driver. Having a “job” to do will keep you involved and included in the festivities – even if you’re one of the few not drinking.

Of course, it’s up to you to share why you’re abstaining from alcohol but either way you should plan out what to say if someone asks. Having a skit of sorts in your head about why you’re not drinking will make you much more confident and able to turn down a drink. Another trick: Do your best to keep a drink in your hand – seltzer with lemon or lime, for example – so no one has to offer.  

When you get to the party, take a look around and scope out the sober fun – whether a creative food station, photo booth, dance floor, raffle – these can be your go-to zones where drinking isn’t taking center stage.

And throughout the night, take a minute to survey the room for those who may be overdoing it on the booze – it can be a great reminder about why you’re staying on track. Recovery is a 365 day a year priority – so celebrate it along with the holidays as you give yourself the gift of sobriety.

Tis The Season to Enjoy Sobriety
Sobriety is the beginning of a fun, fulfilling and lifelong adventure – and there’s no better time to begin than this holiday season. Our schedule of activities is designed to strategically fill your time, nourish your body and enrich your spirit. To learn more how we can help you transition from rehab to everyday life without losing your way, call us today: 888-551-4715.  

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Why Giving Back Strengthens Your Recovery


giving back
Today is #GivingTuesday – and it’s a great time to talk about how giving your time to those in the addiction community can help others as well as strengthen your own recovery. 

For one, when you’re selfless, you’re much less likely to relapse. This is partly because being of service to others will help prevent you from being in service to your addiction. Spending time volunteering helps you to fill any downtime you have now that your life no longer revolves around using. It’s a healthy way to turn the negative emotions of addiction recovery -- including shame, guilt or anxiety -- into positive ones. You’ll get out of your head and into the community where you can really make a difference in someone’s life. 

5 Recovery Benefits of Volunteering
  • You’ll repay society. A big part of building a new sober life is contributing to society in a positive way – and there’s no better way! 
  • You’ll meet new friends. Through volunteering, you can develop bonds with new people who have similar experiences and can help support your recovery. 
  • You’ll gain job experience. Depending on the capacity of your volunteer work, you can develop some skills that will be attractive to potential employers.
  • You’ll gain confidence. It goes without saying that helping someone else will make you feel better about you! And confidence is a strong ally on the long road to recovery. 
  • You’ll improve your health. Ever hear of “giver’s glow?” This is the phrase used to describe the many health perks of giving back. Some include lower blood pressure, decreased risk of depression and anxiety, higher self-esteem and increased happiness. 
Help Yourself and Others at Haus Recovery
During your stay at the HAUS, we hope you take advantage of the mentorship offered, and in turn, benefit fellow residents with your personal recovery insights. In time, everyone grows in strength and empowerment as they share both doubts and successes. To learn more about our mentoring services, call today: 888-551-4715.




Monday, November 19, 2018

Hosting a Sober Thanksgiving

sober Thanksgiving
Now that you’re sober, it’s time to rethink any old traditions that don’t mesh with your new healthy lifestyle – and this may include Thanksgiving. One way to do this is to host your own sober Thanksgiving!

There’s really no wrong way to celebrate – it can be a small, stress-free gathering, it can be a hike with friends or trip to the movies – so long as there’s no alcohol or illicit substances and you’re making new memories with people you love.

Make it manageable, not stressful. When you’re planning you’re Thanksgiving, consider what you can and can't handle. For example, do you need to order take-out or make it a potluck because cooking is too much? Is everyone on the guest list supportive of your sobriety? If you find that what originally sounded like a good way to celebrate Turkey Day is causing high levels of stress, ask for help. Reach out to your therapist or support group or ask a trusted friend or family member to pitch in. Hosting a sober Thanksgiving shouldn’t mean putting your sobriety at risk by causing high levels of stress.

Emphasize that it’s a sober event. From your invite to your reminder call or text a few days before, make sure that all of your guests know that it’s a sober event with no alcohol or other illicit substances. And for any guests who are not in recovery, you may even need to remind them that it’s also not OK to be under the influence when they arrive. Ask guests to bring their favorite nonalcoholic beverage and put out some fun drinking glasses.

Don’t skimp on self-care. To be your best sober self this holiday, make sure that you exercise, eat a healthful breakfast and practice relaxation strategies on the morning of Thanksgiving. Why not start your day by taking time to reflect on how your life has changed since you’ve gotten sober and how friends and family have helped with your journey? It's Thanksgiving after all – and what better time to show gratitude!

Preventing Relapse All Season
A relapse only requires a moment of weakness; when the stresses of life overwhelm you, it’s easy to turn to your drug of choice in order to escape. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.



Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Creating a Mindfulness Practice for Work

mindfulness work
As you begin working again, it’s important to incorporate mindfulness into your workday. For one, it can help keep stress at bay and it can also help squash any self-defeating thoughts that come your way. Here are a few ways to become mindful during your busy day.

Perform a bite-sized mindful exercise. It can take as little as one minute and no one will even have to know you’re doing it. You don’t need to sit down or close your eyes – just find time to connect with your sense. What do you see, smell, hear – and how is this making you feel at the moment?

Kick your multi-tasking habit. Single-tasking instead of multi-tasking will allow you to be more present and mindful about what you’re doing. And, surprisingly, it may even help you be more productive during the workday.

Set a timer. It’s normal to go into auto-pilot mode during the workday and a little reminder to be mindful can’t hurt. Set your smartphone (on vibrate so it doesn’t disturb others) once or twice  a day. When the alarm goes off, take a long mindful breath or pause and take note of your surroundings.

Pay attention to the signs of stress. We all experience stress but being mindful about how stress impacts your body – how your heart speeds, breathing accelerates – can help you better respond to stress. Being aware of these physical signs can help you learn to be grateful for how your body works to increase oxygen and stay energized to cope with the challenges ahead. After all, mindfulness is synonymous with gratitude. The goal, then, is to realize and appreciate what you have and how others have helped you live the sober life you so deserve! 

Employment Help at HAUS
Accountability and being self-supporting are vital steps to the reintegration process, so we encourage our clients to work. Our staff will assist with resume building and more. To learn more about our services, contact us today: 888-551-4715.




Tuesday, October 9, 2018

How Gut Health Affects Mental Health


gut health mental healthIt’s Mental Illness Awareness Week, and it’s the perfect time to talk about the relationship between your gut and your mental health. Researchers are continuing to reveal the mental health benefits of a healthy gut population of beneficial bacteria. This is because healthy gut bacteria elevate blood levels of the amino acid tryptophan, which increases levels of the mood-boosting chemical serotonin. In people with a mental illness, like depression, serotonin levels are normally low.  

Anxiety and depression can cause changes in the gut microbiome, according to Mental Health America (MHA). This is why people struggling with mental illness often experience gastrointestinal woes like heartburn, indigestion, acid reflux, bloating, pain, constipation and/or diarrhea. Sound familiar?

The best thing you can do to keep your gut healthy is to eat a balanced and nutritious daily diet. In addition, regular exercise, ample sleep and relaxation techniques should be part of your recovery plan to help keep your mind and body functioning at its best. 

Here are a few gut-friendly diet tips from MHA to consider:
  • Do your best to eat a diet full whole grains, lean meats, fish, fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Skip or limit sugary, fried, or processed foods and soft drinks.
  • Load up on prebiotic foods like asparagus, bananas (especially if they aren’t quite ripe), garlic, onions, jicama, tomatoes, apples, berries and mangos.
  • Add probiotic foods to your diet. This includes yogurt (live or active cultures), unpasteurized sauerkraut and kimchi, miso soup, kefir, kombucha (fermented black tea), tempeh (made of soy beans) and apple cider vinegar.

Relapse Prevention at Haus Recovery
A big part of staying on the sober path is paying attention to your emotional well-being and realizing when it needs a little extra TLC. Keeping relapse at bay is about cementing new healthy habits and remaining accountable to the recovery support system – and we’re here to help. To learn more about our recovery residences, call today: 888-551-4725.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Sober Fall Fun in Santa Monica

Fall is finally here — and sunny Southern California is the perfect place to soak up the seasonal fun. From hiking to pumpkin picking, we’ve pulled together a few autumn-inspired activities to add to your sober fun list this fall.
  • Take in the scenery. Fall is perhaps the best season to go for a hike or visit a nearby park where you can simply enjoy the scenery. Bonus: When you experience beauty, like the vibrant colors of leaves, the part of your brain that contains your relaxation response center is activated, and you’ll feel more relaxed and in a better mood.
  • Set up camp. Cooler temperatures plus fewer mosquitos makes the perfect recipe for camping. Looking for a nature break without sleeping outdoors? There are tons of “glamping” (or glamorous camping) spots nearby Santa Monica.
  • Savor seasonal eats. You can certainly take a day to go apple picking or pumpkin picking in one of the many spots around Los Angeles — or just head to your local farmer’s market for seasonal produce. Superfoods like pumpkin, apples, sweet potatoes, squash and figs will help to keep you healthy and nourished this season. And don’t forget about seasonal spices: The scent of cinnamon, for instance, has been study-proven to sharpen your mind.
  • Play like a kid. Whether you arrange a few friends and head to a pumpkin patch for a corn maze race or play flag football or soccer in the park, fall is a prime time to head outdoors. The brisk, fresh air will feel great on your skin and in your lungs and the benefits will extend to your mental state, too.
More Sober Living Activities
At Haus Recovery, we whole-heartedly believe that sustained recovery should incorporate daily fun. To this end, we offer bikes, surfboards and paddleboards for residents and organize group activities and outings every week. To learn more, call today: 888-551-4715.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Healthy Ways to Have Fun in Recovery

Now that you’re sober, you have a lot of sober fun in your future. In fact, finding healthy ways to enjoy life is key to lasting sobriety. 

Life in recovery is more than just meeting goals, learning and practicing coping skills and restructuring your life. It’s about finding joy, hope and love in life. What are you waiting for? Write down a few sober activities that you might enjoy and prioritize your list. 

Here are a few ways to ensure fun in recovery. 
  • Meet other people. While getting out and meeting new people can seem intimidating, it’s an important part of branching out and having fun during recovery. Sign up for a reading or running group, talk to someone new at your next support group or make a point to introduce yourself to the neighbor you always see at the park. Socializing with others will help you continue to get to know the new sober you and meet like-minded people. 
  • Try a hobby. Hobbies can help you meet new friends with shared interests and fill your newfound time with something you’re passionate about. But what kind of hobby is right for you? Try a few until you find one that fits. There are so many potential choices - from stamp collecting to cabinetry to cooking to joining a running club. Just keep in mind that with most hobbies comes a learning curve, so don’t get discouraged if it takes some time to get the hang of it. 
  • Consider travel. Getting away and discovering new places is a great stress reliever and it’s also a great way to meet new people and experience something different from everyday life. If you can’t afford a big trip, try taking a tour of a nearby city. You’ll be amazed at how much there is to learn right in your own backyard.
  • Laugh always and often. Learning how to laugh at life and yourself is perhaps the best way to enjoy your life in recovery – and it’s free. The road to sobriety is tough and some days will feel never-ending. Take an opportunity to find the funny in even the most mundane recovery tasks. 

Finding Fun at Haus Recovery
We believe sobriety is the beginning of a fun, fulfilling and lifelong adventure. To learn about our program and how we can help you feel good about life and sobriety, call today: 888-551-4715.